Butternut Squash and Hazelnut Lasagne

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Late in the evening yesterday, I decided I wanted to make some sort of veggie lasagna for dinner. Little did I know that I’d be eating it at midnight! But that’s just how it happened. Everything seemed to take longer than usual-deciding on a recipe, waiting for the bus to the grocery store, waiting in line at the store, waiting for the bus back, prepping the veggies and other ingredients, preheating the oven, etc. So, I ended up having just a small slice and calling it a night. I wanted more, but knew that my acid reflux would retaliate if I pigged out right before bedtime.

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Today, I reheated a couple of slices for lunch, (I shared the second slice!) and it actually tasted better. I may have just been hungrier, or maybe my sense of taste and smell is better at that time of day, but I think having it sit in the fridge overnight may have helped the flavors blend better. The recipe is from epicurious; I made the recipe according to the directions, but added some vegan sausage (Field Roast Apple Sage Sausage, crumbled up and sautéed in olive oil) to the filling, which went very well with it, I think.

Ingredients:

For the filling:

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
  • 1 cup hazelnuts (4 oz), toasted, loose skins rubbed off with a kitchen towel, and coarsely chopped
  • 2 Field Roast Apple Sage vegan sausage links, crumbled and sautéed in olive oil (optional)

For sauce

  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 5 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 5 cups milk
  • 1 bay leaf (not California)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon white pepper

For assembling lasagna

  • 1/2 lb fresh mozzarella, coarsely grated (2 cups)
  • 1 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (3 oz)
  • 12 (7- by 3 1/2-inch) sheets no-boil lasagne (1/2 lb)

Preparation

Make filling: Cook onion in butter in a deep 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden, about 10 minutes. Add squash, garlic, salt, and white pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until squash is just tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in parsley, sage, and nuts. Sautee 2 Field Roast Apple Sage sausages, crumbled up in a pan with a tablespoon of olive oil, until slightly browned and toasted. Stir into filling. Cool.

Make sauce while squash cooks: Cook garlic in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately low heat, stirring, 1 minute. Whisk in flour and cook roux, whisking, 3 minutes. Add milk in a stream, whisking. Add bay leaf and bring to a boil, whisking constantly, then reduce heat and simmer, whisking occasionally, 10 minutes. Whisk in salt and white pepper and remove from heat. Discard bay leaf. (Cover surface of sauce with wax paper if not using immediately.)

Assemble lasagne: Preheat oven to 425°F. Toss cheeses together. Spread 1/2 cup sauce in a buttered 13- by 9- by 2-inch glass baking dish (or other shallow 3-quart baking dish) and cover with 3 pasta sheets, leaving spaces between sheets. Spread with 2/3 cup sauce and one third of filling, then sprinkle with a heaping 1/2 cup cheese. Repeat layering 2 more times, beginning with pasta sheets and ending with cheese. Top with remaining 3 pasta sheets, remaining sauce, and remaining cheese.

Tightly cover baking dish with buttered foil and bake lasagne in middle of oven 30 minutes. Remove foil and bake until golden and bubbling, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let lasagne stand 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

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Cooks’ note: Filling and sauce can be made 1 day ahead and kept separately, covered and chilled. Bring to room temperature before assembling.

7 thoughts on “Butternut Squash and Hazelnut Lasagne

    • Yeah, I love eating things with hazelnuts, but using them can sometimes be a pain. The toasting process is necessary, but the skins don’t come off easy. I’ve used another version of taking out the skins that involved boiling water and baking soda, but then you have to dry them, so either way, it’s a little time consuming. But good things sometimes take time. Thanks for stopping by!

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  1. Ooh, that looks good – I always find veggie lasagne tastes better next day too, like you say I think the flavours blend together better. This looks a delicious combo, definitely one to try 🙂

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    • It’s one of those recipes that seems healthy, because squash, but it is a little on the heavy side, with all the things sauteed in butter, but it’s such a treat. Thanks for stopping by.

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