gingerbread scones

Even though the King Arthur Flour recipe that I used for inspiration is for ginger scones, not gingerbread scones, I went with the same spice combination, minus the coriander–ginger, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, cardamom, and black pepper–but I upped the amount of butter mixed into the dough and also added some whole wheat flour into the mix. For variety. I figured I am still honoring the definition of gingerbread, which is basically molasses and ginger together, even though there are a ton of other spices and flavors as well. Feel free to increase the ratio of whole wheat flour to regular flour, as well as to decrease the amounts of each individual spice, or the minced ginger, if you feel it might be too overpowering. Happy Baking!

ginger molasses scones (makes 8 large scones, based on recipes from KAF and from Joy of Baking)

ingredients

1/2 cup unsalted butter, very cold, cut into small cubes

1 and 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup whole wheat flour (or more all-purpose flour)

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon fine salt

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves, scant

1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1/2 cup milk (I used oat milk), very cold

3 Tablespoons blackstrap molasses

1 and 1/2 Tablespoons fresh ginger, minced

Egg wash + coarse sugar, optional

method

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Set aside.

In a medium to large bowl, mix together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and spices, plus the sugar into a bowl and stir with a whisk several times to break up the brown sugar and to get all the dry ingredients thoroughly blended together.

Cut cold butter into Tablespoons, then cut each tablespoon into about 12 small cubes.

Toss the cold butter into the flour mixture and using your thumbs and forefingers press each cube of butter until all of them are slivers or “leaves”.

In a small glass or bowl, mix together the cold milk with the molasses and minced ginger and stir or whisk together until all the molasses is dissolved together with the milk and the ginger.

Pour the milk/molasses/ginger mixture into the flour/butter ingredients in the bowl and stir with a spoon or spatula until a scone dough starts to come together, but with a few dry areas of flour. 

Lightly flour one of the baking sheets and transfer dough on top of the floured area. Dough will be sticky with dry areas, but work with a spatula or rubber scraper to fold dough a few times to get it more consistent. Do not fold too much.

Pat dough down into a thick disc, then cut into 8 equal triangular pie pieces with a sharp chef’s knife, being careful not to use a sawing motion.

Carefully lift each piece with the chef’s knife, or using an offset spatula, just to separate each scone from the others, but still keep them together on the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet with them in the freezer for about 30 minutes to get them cold while you heat up the oven.

Heat oven to 425 degrees.

When ready to bake, transfer each scone to the other (room temperature) baking sheet, arranging them at least an inch and a half between each scone. Brush the top of each scone with egg wash and sprinkle generously with turbinado sugar on top of each scone.

Bake for about 22 minutes, rotating the baking sheet after about 14 minutes, until golden browned on top. Will last for 2-3 days at room temperature, wrapped, or in freezer for a month.

Remove from the oven to cool slightly before consuming.

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